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Graham’s Ne Oublie awarded in the Clube de Criativos de Portugal Awards 2015

It was with great pleasure that we saw Graham’s Ne Oublie awarded across four categories at the Clube de Criativos de Portugal 17th annual award ceremony in May. The Clube de Criativos is a non-profit organisation that aims to recognise, promote and award the best of commercial creativity in Portugal.

A truly rare, very old tawny Port, Ne Oublie (which means never forget, and is the motto of the Graham family) was released in 2014. Dating to 1882, the wine was purchased by Andrew James Symington in the 1920s to commemorate his arrival in Portugal, and has been passed down through generations of the Symington family. Find out more here.

Ne Oublie

Bottled in crystal decanters, made by Atlantis in Portugal, wrapped by silver bands made by the Scottish silversmiths Hayward and Scott, and presented in a handcrafted leather box by Smythson of London, Ne Oublie is beautiful to behold.

The launch of the wine was accompanied by the creation of an online platform dedicated to the Port and a film, directed by Artur Serra Araújo, which captured the essence of the Douro and Ne Oublie. The film can be seen here. It was awarded gold for both “Best Brand Entertainment Film” and “Best Direction”. The project was also distinguished in the “Digital and Interactive” and “Overall Project” categories.

Portuguese Journalists Travel to Smythson of Bond St. to Learn More About Ne Oublie

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Smythson Bond Street store
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Smythson Bond Street store

On the 24th of October, three Portuguese journalists travelled to London to visit the world famous purveyor of luxury stationary and leather goods, Smythson of Bond Street. The objective of the visit was to gain an insight into both the design and production of the Ne Oublie presentation case and decanter. Ne Oublie, a very special and rare port wine dating from the arrival of Andrew James Symington in Portugal in 1882, was released this year and is contained in a crystal decanter (by Atlantis of Portugal) adorned with silver bands (by Hayward & Stott of Scotland), and housed in a presentation case by Smythson of Bond Street.

The journalists present were: Sandra Gato, director of the Portuguese edition of Elle magazine; Bruno Lobo, writer of the Diario Economico supplement, Fora de Série; and Vanda Jorge, a presenter from the TV program Imagens de Marca on the Portuguese television channel SIC Noticias. 

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Smythson Craftsman
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Interview with Gordon Smith

The journalists were introduced to the Smythson brand and the concept of Ne Oublie with the Smythson designers in their flagship store at 40 Bond Street. They were also able to interview Gordon Smith, of Smith & Co., who designed the Ne Oublie decanter and came up with the initial concept for the presentation case. Graham’s partnership with Gordon Smith began in 2011 with the redesign of the tawny range, and the development of a limited edition tawny port bottled to commemorate the diamond jubilee of Queen Elizabeth II. After the interviews they spent some time with the craftsmen at Smythson and had the opportunity to see the fabrication of one of the presentation cases.

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Ne Oublie displayed in the museum space of the Smythson Bond Street store

Afterwards, it was revealed that Graham’s Ne Oublie would be proudly displayed in the museum section of Smythson in an exhibition focusing on the bespoke box work undertaken by the company throughout the years. Also displayed with Ne Oublie are a Post Box from 1902, a 1909 bridge card box, a 1902 Smythson workbox, the company’s founder Frank Smythson’s personal trinket box, and a Whiskey & Soda box from 1920.

The connection between Smythson and the Symington family goes back a long time as the grandfather of the current generation of the family, Maurice Symington, recorded his thoughts in leather diaries handmade by the founder Frank Smythson himself. The company was founded in 1887 by Frank Smythson, and throughout the years has produced leather goods for people such as Queen Victoria and Sir Edmond Hillary, among other illustrious clients.

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“The Silent Friend” whisky and soda box in the museum space of the Smythson store

 

           

Memories come in many forms… Graham’s Ne Oublie Very Old Tawny Port

Three generations of the Symington Family (the custodians of Graham’s Port since 1970) have been launching Graham’s rare Ne Oublie Very Old Tawny Port: a wine dating from the time Andrew James Symington arrived in Portugal to work for Graham’s in 1882.

The wine was bought to commemorate the year of AJS’ arrival in Portugal and what would become the beginning of his family’s commitment to Port, the Douro and Portugal. This wine has become symbolic of the family’s legacy.

27 members of the Symingtons gathered at Christie’s in London for the official launch in the UK, followed a week later by the official event in the Graham’s 1890 Lodge in Vila Nova de Gaia to reveal the wine in Portugal.

27 members of the Symington family at Christie's, London

Graham’s Ne Oublie has a touching story, which is told in every detail. The blood of three nations flows in the veins of the Symington family; so, it was only fitting that artisans from these three, Portugal, Scotland and England, should craft the packaging for this very rare, very special wine. The wine is bottled in an individually numbered, handmade crystal decanter designed by Portugal’s leading glass manufacturer Atlantis. Three sterling silver bands adorn the glass, moulded and engraved by Scottish silversmiths, Hayward & Stott and carrying the mark of the Edinburgh Assay office.

The leather case has been handmade by Smythson’s of Bond Street, luxury British leather craftsmen. This is a peculiarly apt expression of the family’s history, since Maurice Symington, grandfather of the current generation of directors, recorded his thoughts and experiences in leather diaries handmade by Frank Smythson himself.

When the small bottles of Ne Oublie were opened at Christie’s and at Graham’s Lodge to give journalists and fine wine merchants their first taste of this remarkable wine the whole room was filled with the wine’s complex perfumes.

Victoria Moore at The Telegraph described the experience:

“It’s an incredible piece of history… I could smell it a foot away from the glass, curling, intense, like bitter orange peel and caramelized clementines, then tasting rich with dried fruit and toasted almonds underneath it. Not like wine at all, really, but delicious. I was still enjoying the nose before I washed up this morning, emailed a friend who had poured a tiny glass the night before. That is some wine. And it will go on.”

After enduring over 130 hot summers first in the Douro and then in the cooler maritime climate of Vila Nova de Gaia on Portugal’s Atlantic coast this wine is something special.

Andrew Jefford in his article in World of Fine Wine captures this wine’s story:

“You simply can’t create complexity of this order in under a century or so, I suspect… There was a cleanliness and a precision about the wine, though, that was a testament to 130 years of exemplary stewardship… a synopsis of life and time.”

In their blog, Lea & Sandeman, ruminate on the impact that Ne Oublie might have: “As an exercise in shining a light on Port, Paul hopes this extravagant release will turn heads – and it certainly should, this is a fabulous, fascinating drink which illustrates brilliantly the remarkable potential and fascinating complexity achievable in this historic wine region.”

There is certainly a lot of excitement around this wine. Those present at these two launch events were privileged to witness the preview of a specially commissioned short film, directed by the Portuguese filmmaker Artur Serra Araújo, which you can see here. You can also read more information about the people and the stories behind this remarkable and rare treasure here.

The Symingtons have neatly summarised what this wine means to their family: Memories come in many forms; ours just happen to be in wine.